Poetry Corner: VE Day 75 – Wait for Me

As part of the celebrations around the 75th Anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, Challenge’s Poetry Corner will be featuring a selection of poems from across the world, inspired by the war and its events.

Here we feature Wait for Me written in 1941 by Konstantin Simonov. The poem is written from the perspective of a Soviet soldier heading to the front, addressing their spouse or partner. It became a favourite of Soviet servicemen and women at the time and continues to be popular in Russia today.

Poetry Corner: A Few Poems for Lenin’s Birthday

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, known to us as Lenin, was born 150 years ago on the 22nd of April. His effect on history, on revolutionary thought and on the minds of the people of this world, all remain possibly unparalleled by any figure of the tumultuous 20th century. One of the ways in which Lenin remained immortalised was by the admiration displayed for him by various artists around the world, especially writers. Lenin remains, as Marcel Liebman once wrote, a figure which nearly every insurrectionary movement claims as their heritage.

ONES TO WATCH: White Flowers

Hailing from Preston and operating out of an abandoned textile mill; the two piece, made up of Katie Drew and Joey Cobb, blend together a sound reminiscent of The KVB and Cocteau Twins. Ethereal and yet somehow near impossible to pin down, the band itself describes its work as Gothic Dreampop.  ‘Night Drive’ draws youContinue reading “ONES TO WATCH: White Flowers”

Is English cricket doomed to remain elite forever?

Independent schools are thankfully not things that prey excessively on my mind. Having received a state education and living in an area devoid entirely of private education, my daily life was never concerned with them or their influence until I left for university. I’d managed, in fact, to stay proudly ignorant for the majority ofContinue reading “Is English cricket doomed to remain elite forever?”

The Strokes and Their Synthpop Belter With Soft Vocals ‘The New Abnormal’

This new work from The Strokes is a breath of fresh air in the times of the Covid 19. ‘The New Abnormal’ is their first album since ‘Comedown Machine’ which was released seven years ago and it’s ten times better in my view. This being said it’s a polar opposite from their first album ‘IsContinue reading “The Strokes and Their Synthpop Belter With Soft Vocals ‘The New Abnormal’”

Bridging the divide: the cosmos and the two cultures

From the Babylonians to the Greeks to the Mayans, the practises of science and literature existed in some form or another at the centre of every ancient civilisation. They represented to them what they continue to do to us today: the most fundamental desire of our species to know the world around us, and to share that knowledge with others. Tens of thousands of years came and went while spending little time at all drawing distinction between these disciplines – ones today we perceive as being repellent strangers to one another – as often they were one single entity. Ancient aborigine civilisations considered the stars the campfires of passed spirits, spawning many a story that were undoubtedly shared around more terrestrial campfires, from generation to generation, through spoken word rather than ink and parchment.

Somewhere down the line, between then and now, the entity broke in two.

Birds in the poetry of Edward Thomas

Depending on your persuasion, Edward Thomas was either a prominent War Poet, or simply a poet who just so happened to serve and die in the First World War. It is often a controversial categorisation to make, as he wrote much of his work before being drafted and a good majority does not mention theContinue reading “Birds in the poetry of Edward Thomas”

The Lighthouse review

“Tis when the workin’ stops that yer twix wind and water.  Doldrum. Doldrum. Eviler than the devil.  Boredom makes men to villians and the water goes quick lad… vanished.” That’s not a public service announcement reminding us to stay busy and productive in these exceptionally crazy times. It’s a snippet of the dense poetic dialogueContinue reading “The Lighthouse review”