If not Ukraine, then somewhere else

Grant MacDonald examines the West's influence over the conflict in Ukraine
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on whatsapp
Share on print

The Financial collapse and shameless plunder of Iraq and Afghanistan by Western imperialist states brought with it a practical exposure of national illusions over maintaining a ‘global order’.

If the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were to have been successful for the imperialists, this would have been a gigantic, international calamity. If Imperialist powers had won an international victory, to the extent of 20-30 per cent, even such a weak victory would have created grounds for even ‘larger’ wars. Because Iraq and Afghanistan are next doors to Iran; thus an imperialist victory in these Countries would allow the imperialist forces to undermine any other nations that have resisted or outmanoeuvred the capitalist ‘modernisers’ in Washington.

Yet, the situation that leads to western imperialist ‘intervention’ in these countries – a wish for regime change, ‘modernisation’ and ‘fair’ oil exchange, is a core part of a narrative that is so firmly ingrained in the minds of imperialist ‘war hawks’ in Washington that it gains a perverted sort of flexibility as the international situation evolves.

The narrative has re-emerged, this time with panic over so-called Russian “aggression” in Ukraine. The US has claimed that Russia has amassed weapons at the border, ignoring the internal politics of Ukraine, the reputed dismissal of NATO, by its members, non-expansion, and so much more. The American and allied imperialist powers conduct a cold war of position in Ukraine.

To this tune, war is at least ideologically beneficial to the exasperated capitalists of America and its allies. As their global order falls into disrepute, America, much like any other empire before it, seeks valorisation in a new conflict.

The whole situation is drenched in absurdity – Ukrainian Foreign Minister Oleksii Reznikov has said no Russian military manoeuvres had been observed that were any more threatening than those of a year ago, and there was no reason to fear an imminent attack. The president of Ukraine has even stated that the US and its allies should tone down their calls for war.

However, the US and its allies are continually attempting to increase geopolitical tensions. Only recently did president Biden promise to put thousands of extra troops on standby for deployment to Europe – where the US already has tens of thousands deployed alongside NATO’s forward bases in the Baltic states. Moreover, the neo-fascist Azov Batallion have received training and funding from the likes of Canada.

America’s aims for war with Russia are materially motivated. The US wishes to hamper the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, which would increase European dependence on Russian Gas, especially for Germany.

Yet, even the Ukrainian government is keen to halt or at least alter the project as it would lose transit fees from current Russian Gas pipelines if the new project goes ahead. Hence why Zelensky, despite attempting to quieten the Western war hawks, still called for sanctions on Nord stream.

A situation such as this can result in chaos given the right conditions. One nation’s deterrence can be another’s declaration of war. Whether in the US or here in Britain, few parliamentarians are willing to be honest about the fragility of the situation.

The Maidan coup that provoked the conflict in 2014 has unleashed in Ukraine a world of contradictions. A civil war, state-sponsored neo-fascist paramilitaries, flirtation with historical revisionism, war crimes, profiteering, and much more.

Thus, the situation in Ukraine and the international sabre-rattling surrounding it merits careful attention. Stronger minds and stronger wills must prevail as If not Ukrainian, then it will be war with someone else.

Grant MacDonald, is a member of the YCL’s Edinburgh branch

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on whatsapp
Share on print