Derek Chauvin sentenced to 22 years and six months in prison for murder of George Floyd

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been sentenced to 22 years and 6 months in prison for his murder of Gorge Floyd last year.

Charges brought against the murderers of Dea-John Reid

On Monday (31 April 2021) at 07:30pm, Dea-John Reid, 14, was found with a stab wound on College Road in Birmingham. Police in the area have said that Dea-John died from a stab wound to the chest area. The stabbing appeared to take place following a racially-charged fight outside a McDonalds where the local police sighted seven suspects running away from the fast food establishment. So far, four men and two children have been arrested by West Midlands police in connection to the murder. Two of the men and a 13 year old boy have been released with no further action to be taken by the police.

Home Office found guilty after inflicting years of pain

A man who came to Britain from Congo at the age of 13 in 2003 has got a rare win for immigrants in Britain. The High Court finally ruled in favour of Sam Louis’ claim following a decade of false imprisonment and legal hostility.

Communist Party: Sewell Commission on race falls at first hurdle

Tony Conway, convenor of the Communist Party’s Anti-Racist Anti-Fascist Commission issued a response for the Party to the whitewash report of the Tory Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities earlier this week.

Rangers bow out amid Slavia racism row

Thursday nights Rangers V Slavia Prague match ended 1-3 on aggregate with the Czech side going through to the Quarter finals of the Europa League, drawing the Ibrox sides European campaign to a close. However, it isn’t the score line that is being discussed in the aftermath of the game. 

Holyrood passes controversial Hate Crime Bill

MSPs have passed what has been described as “Scotland’s most controversial piece of legislation”. The Hate Crime and Public Order (Scotland) Bill was passed on Thursday (11 March 2021) by 82 votes to 32, with 4 abstentions after a marathon debate of amendments on Wednesday. The legislation seeks to consolidate existing law and extends protection for some vulnerable groups with a new offence of “stirring up hatred”. Concerns have been raised about the potential impact on freedom of speech, with opponents arguing that the full implications of the proposed law have not been thought through. While supporting the principle of protecting people from prejudice, they argue that the definition of “‘stirring up hatred” is too vague and open to interpretation.